Global Aquaculture Supply

Global Aquaculture Supply Providing the highest quality equipment and systems for your aquaculture project. Check in with us today to learn more!
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07/25/2020

We can supply you with all of your aquatic needs. Pumps, ponds, tanks, filters, blowers, aerators, paddle wheels, and more. Just ask.....1-509-859-1618 Mike Fudge

In Honolulu? Stop by the Aquaculture America 2020 show at Booth #6 and visit with our new sales manager Mike Fudge! He c...
02/12/2020

In Honolulu? Stop by the Aquaculture America 2020 show at Booth #6 and visit with our new sales manager Mike Fudge! He can show you all of our outstanding aquaculture supplies and options for your shrimp farm, aquaponics operation, or fish hatchery.
#aquaculture #aquacultureamerica2020 #shrimp #shrimpaquaculture #honolulu

Price Reduction!! Global Aquaculture Supply Company is having a sale on our hatching jars. These McDonald style hatching...
01/12/2020
Hatching Jars

Price Reduction!! Global Aquaculture Supply Company is having a sale on our hatching jars. These McDonald style hatching jars are the industry standard used in hatcheries around the world. Perfect for incubating many species of eggs, these come complete with all parts needed. Their high strength plastic construction will stand up to the rigorous demands of use in the hatchery environment. 18" Tall x 6 1/4" Diameter. This item ships for free via standard ground. Jar stands are also available.

https://globalaquaculturesupply.com/hatching-jars/#product-tab-description

#GASC #globalaquaculturesupply #globalaquaculturesupplycompany #aquaculture #hatchingjars #pricereduction #sale

McDonald style hatching jars are used all over the world in hatcheries for a variety of species. Click here to view and purchase today with free shipping!

#teamworkmakesthedreamwork
06/03/2019

#teamworkmakesthedreamwork

Director Chris Manley assisted our affiliate Global Aquaculture Supply in a build out for one of GASC’s clients. Chris is pictured with Greg Trusso of GASC. Perciformes’ expertise in system design and building played a key role in the success of the project.

#perciformes #perciformesgroup #aquaculture #recirculatingaquaculture #recirculatingaquaculturesystems #globalaquaculturesupply #globalaquaculturesupplycompany #design #systemdesign #aquaculturesystems

05/27/2019
Come visit Greg Trusso at our booth at the RASTech trade fair in Washington, DC today and tomorrow!#RASTech #RASTech2019...
05/13/2019

Come visit Greg Trusso at our booth at the RASTech trade fair in Washington, DC today and tomorrow!

#RASTech #RASTech2019 #RAS #aquaculture #recirculatingaquaculture #recirculatingaquaculturesystems #tradefair #aquacultureequipment #aquaculturesupplies

Follow the links on each photo for these awesome deals!#aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #GASC #aquaculture
03/27/2019

Follow the links on each photo for these awesome deals!

#aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #GASC #aquaculture

#AquacultureInsights by Greg TrussoUV SYSTEMS: What Are They and Why Do We Use Them?To follow up on our latest post abou...
03/18/2019

#AquacultureInsights by Greg Trusso

UV SYSTEMS: What Are They and Why Do We Use Them?

To follow up on our latest post about biosecurity, we will continue now and dive deeper into the world of UV sterilizers. UV systems are probably the most common form of process water disinfection that we find in our travels to various aquaculture facilities. The reasons for this are quite simple as they are easy to install, simple to operate, and can be added to new or existing operations.

Before we get into the benefits of UV sterilization, we should first consider how they operate so we can better understand the uses and limitations of this technology. The most basic way to describe their operation is that water is passed through a vessel containing one or more light bulbs. Instead of putting off visible light, like your light bulbs at home, UV systems emit light in the ultraviolet spectrum. At very specific wavelengths of light (specifically 254 nanometers for our applications), the light causes an interesting effect on cells. The UV light does not actually kill any organism, but rather damages the DNA of the cell, rendering it unable to reproduce. By causing a double bond between two adjacent bases, the cell is unable to reproduce it’s DNA and thus the organism perishes shortly thereafter.

UV sterilizers provide a dual benefit of improving water clarity and quality, while at the same time reducing populations of pathogens within the system. We typically see UV systems installed on recirculating growout, nursery, and hatchery systems, as well as on incoming and outgoing water supplies for aquaculture facilities. On inlet water, the main purpose of these systems is to remove any potential pathogens before they enter the facility. In recirculating systems, UVs prevent water cloudiness due to bacterial blooms and prevent opportunistic pathogens from replicating and growing in population. This is very important, because in the high stocking density environments in which we operate, it is easy for disease to spread once introduced. Many systems with chronic disease problems are cured once a UV is added and the owner wonders why they didn’t add one years before!

UV Systems are effective against a wide variety of pathogens, including those most commonly seen in aquaculture: viruses, bacteria, and protozoa. To ensure proper sterilization of a system, it is important to size a UV system properly. There are three main criteria that we use to size a UV system. First is water flow rate. This determines the contact time of the UV light with each gallon of water passing through the system. Second is UV transmittance of the water. UV transmittance (UVT) refers to the ability of UV light to pass through water. While this may sound like turbidity to many people, clear water can actually have a very low UVT value due to dissolved metals which act like sponges, soaking up the available UV light and causing UVs to not function properly. The final value we look at for sizing is required UV dose. Each pathogen has a different cellular structure, and as such, some require a higher or lower UV dose to effectively destroy the organism. The “standard” UV dose of 30 mJ/cm2 is acceptable for many types of bacteria, but larger organisms like Cryptocaryon irritans (white spot) may require 280 mJ/cm2, and some may require even more! As such, it is important to always share proper information with whoever may be sizing your UV system, as undersizing on any of these parameters will cause the UV to not function as desired. For more information on UV systems and how they can benefit your facility, please reach out to any of our Global Aquaculture Supply representatives and we will be glad to help you!

#aquaculture #UV #UVsystem #virus #bacteria #protozoa #recirculatingaquaculture #globalaquaculturesupply #aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #sterilization

Brian Schutt

President Brian Schutt is happy to be back in the Global Aquaculture Supply building today. He has returned from trips t...
03/15/2019

President Brian Schutt is happy to be back in the Global Aquaculture Supply building today. He has returned from trips to the World Aquaculture Society Conference in New Orleans, LA and meetings with representatives from our Global Blue Technologies affiliated companies in San Antonio, TX. Stay tuned for our next #AquacultureInsights blog which will be available next week!

#globalaquaculturesupply #aquaculture #aqua19 #WAS19 #recirculatingaquaculture #sustainableaquaculture #neworleans #sanantonio #GASC

The gang's all here! Be sure to stop by our booth at the World Aquaculture Society Conference in New Orleans. Brian Schu...
03/09/2019

The gang's all here! Be sure to stop by our booth at the World Aquaculture Society Conference in New Orleans. Brian Schutt, Greg Trusso, and Paul Trusso are poised and ready to help with all your aquaculture needs.

#WAS #WAS2019 #globalaquaculturesupply #aquaculture #aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #dreamteam #neworleans #Aquaculture2019

Paul Trusso is manning our booth at the World Aquaculture Society Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. And doing double...
03/08/2019

Paul Trusso is manning our booth at the World Aquaculture Society Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. And doing double duty as he takes an order for an airstone over the phone. The theme for this year’s conference is “Aquaculture - The Big Easy Choice.”

World Aquaculture Society #WAS #WAS2019 #WAS29 #neworleans #NOLA #GASC #globalaquaculturesupplycompany #aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #aquaculture #thebigeasy #airstone #multitasking #doubleduty

Biosecurity and Disinfection, Part IOne of the worst things that can happen in an intensive aquaculture system is a dise...
02/21/2019

Biosecurity and Disinfection, Part I

One of the worst things that can happen in an intensive aquaculture system is a disease outbreak. Due to the close quarters in which we keep our fish, disease can spread rapidly through a system and cause significant treatment costs or even mortality amongst the fish in the system. As such, it is important to prevent disease introduction to a facility. A topic that never seems to get much notice around farms is biosecurity, but that is the focus of today’s post.

Biosecurity, in general, refers to the aquaculture facility’s resistance to disease introduction and spread. Biosecurity can also work in the opposite way, as some facilities are required to maintain strict controls on what leaves the facility in case of potential exotic species release. The concept of a biosecure facility can be broken down to several parts. For now, we will focus on three of the most common points where we see the opportunity for improvement: first, personnel and entry/exit protocols; second, surface disinfection; and third, system disinfection.

Our first point, personnel and entry/exit protocols, is strictly a procedural point. Maintaining biosecurity starts with knowing who and what has entered and exited your facility. The first line of defense for a facility begins with a simple fence. This prevents people from entering the facility unbeknownst to the operator. It also allows for a security gate and sign in/sign out list. We have seen everything from interested people wandering in off the street to ask questions, to people breaking in to steal fish from farmers tanks and ponds. At this point, the farmer should ensure that all visitors are free of contaminants and have not been to other potentially diseased facilities, lakes, or beaches in a reasonable amount of time. Many facilities opt for visitors to remove shoes and use company provided boots to ensure disinfection. All visitors and vehicles should be required to pass through a foot bath or wheel bath containing a disinfectant such as Virkon Aquatic. The same protocol should be used when entering rooms or buildings containing different systems.

Our next point is surface disinfection. Aquaculture facilities, by their very nature, can be breeding grounds for bacteria. Due to the humid, often warm environment we operate in, it is imperative that surfaces be kept clean and free of mold and biofilms. Vigilant cleaning and checklists are recommended to keep employees accountable for this.

Our final point of discussion for today’s post is system disinfection. This refers to the active disinfection components of the aquaculture systems. Typically we treat water with UV radiation or ozone gas for disinfection. There are some great advantages to each of these methods, but first we should discuss where they are placed in a system. The first point of disinfection should always be on the incoming water supply. This is especially important if the water supply is a natural body of water like a lake, stream, or ocean. The natural water can harbor large amounts of pathogens and should always be considered harmful. The next point of disinfection should be on any recirculating systems in the facility. Each system should have it’s own disinfection unit to maintain clean water and low bacteria counts. Finally, water may need to be disinfected again on the way out of the facility, depending on local regulations and the final point of discharge. UV systems are the most common type of disinfection used due to their easy implementation and simple operation. They are able to be added to nearly any aquaculture system and have no residual effect. It is important to size them properly though, as each pathogen requires a different amount of radiation to destroy. Ozone systems are common in larger aquaculture applications, as they have the capability to economically treat massive amounts of water. Ozone can destroy nearly any organic particle in the water column and enables the operator to have crystal clear, clean water. Operators should always be cautious though, as ozone gas is toxic to humans and animals alike, so expert sizing and process controls are always recommended.

Next week we will dive further into UV and ozone systems and why we choose one over the other for specific projects. Thanks for reading!

#AquacultureInsights #GASC #aquaculture #biosecurity #disinfection #ozone #UVradiation #aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #globalaquaculturesupply #globalaquaculturesupplycompany

Our first Investment Opportunity meeting was a success! Dr. Tim T Aberson presented information about the Global Blue Te...
02/20/2019

Our first Investment Opportunity meeting was a success! Dr. Tim T Aberson presented information about the Global Blue Technologies family and the current offer. Brian Schutt gave a tour of our state of the art facility in Alton, IA. And Phil Molnar showed a sample of the some of the engineering work he is currently doing for GASC. Two more meetings are scheduled, if you’d like to join us:

Thursday, 7:00 - 9:00
Saturday, 10:00 - 12:00 noon

Call Travis at (712) 756-4272 to make your reservation or email [email protected]

#globalaquaculturesupply #globalaquaculturesupplycompany #GASC #aquaculture #aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #investmentopportunity

Call TODAY and sign up to learn more about this exciting opportunity!Contact TRAVIS at (712) 756-4272.
02/18/2019

Call TODAY and sign up to learn more about this exciting opportunity!

Contact TRAVIS at (712) 756-4272.

02/08/2019
Biofiltration and the Nitrogen CycleThe second installment of our series #AquacultureInsightsWhen we think about RAS sys...
02/04/2019

Biofiltration and the Nitrogen Cycle

The second installment of our series #AquacultureInsights

When we think about RAS systems, one of the critical steps that is always brought up is biofiltration. Biofilters exist for the purpose of removing the harmful ammonia produced by fish from the system to prevent toxicity. This ammonia is produced by all fish and nearly every other living aquatic creature, be it shrimp, prawns, alligators, or whatever else you may be raising. When in the water, ammonia is a toxic chemical that can cause rapid and significant stock losses. Ammonia is excreted by fish as a product of their digestion and actually exits the fish’s body through the gills. In order to remove ammonia from the system, we rely on bacteria that feed on the ammonia.

Before going any further, it is important to understand the nitrogen cycle and how these bacteria help us accomplish our ultimate goal of biofiltration. The nitrogen cycle we refer to in aquaculture begins with the ammonia excreted by our fish. In the biofilter, the ammonia is first converted to nitrite, a less toxic version of ammonia. This is accomplished by a bacteria called Nitrosomonas. While it is less toxic than ammonia, nitrite can still cause significant health issues in fish. This is where a second bacteria called Nitrobacter comes in to help us. This bacteria converts nitrite into nitrate. Nitrate is the least toxic form of ammonia and is acceptable in our systems in higher concentrations than the forms we mentioned before. Typically, concentrations of 100-500+ ppm are acceptable, depending on the species in question.

To properly convert ammonia to nitrate, the aquaculture system needs to contain a large amount of nitrifying bacteria. This bacteria adheres to all surfaces in the system. Contrary to popular belief, not much of the bacteria is found free floating in the water column. In order to provide enough surface area for the bacteria, we supply an appropriately sized biofilter filled with media containing a high surface area to volume ratio. One of the most common types of biofilter media is plastic K1-style media, such as this. This media is preferable for biofilters as it has a large surface area to volume ratio and due to the specific media design, it resists fouling and clumping. Other common types of media include plastic beads, bio balls, bio barrels, and even sand! The biofilters we use take many forms and typically use an upwelling motion of air or water to keep the media in constant motion. This prevents the media from acting as a mechanical filter and accumulating solids, which decreases the rate of nitrification and actually adds to the ammonia load!

An important thing to remember is that biofiltration should never be taken lightly, as ammonia issues tend to show themselves at the end of the production cycle, when the stocking level is the highest and the farmer has already invested their money into feed, electricity, and marketing for the fish to be sold. To see some examples of complete bio filters, check out our self-contained bioreactors here, or reach out to any of our technical representatives to learn more!

Greg Trusso Brian Schutt

#aquaculture #globalaquaculturesupply #globalaquaculturesupplycompany #aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #recirculatingaquaculture #recirculatingaquaculturesystems #biofiltration #nitrogencycle #biomedia

Today we begin a new series of posts, #AquacultureInsights.Follow along each week as we share tips and suggestions to he...
01/30/2019

Today we begin a new series of posts, #AquacultureInsights.

Follow along each week as we share tips and suggestions to help your aquaculture system thrive!

Handheld Meters
Why do we need them and what do they do?

After an aquaculture project is started, one of the first things that farmers quickly realize is that they want to know more about their systems. The old saying goes that knowledge is power; and in aquaculture that could not be more true. Too often we hear from someone that is experiencing a lack of feeding response or having fish die off due to unknown causes. When diagnosing the system’s issues, we quickly learn that there was no monitoring of oxygen concentrations, ammonia levels, or any other critical parameters in the system. Unfortunately, these problems do not typically manifest themselves until late in the production cycle and if left unchecked can cause critical system failures.

The good news for us is that there are quick, easy, and inexpensive options that can help farmers monitor their system health and quickly diagnose problems, allowing them to react and potentially save their stocks of fish. The first line of defense comes in the form of a handheld meter. Typically these units are small, waterproof devices with a digital screen, small control panel, and a sensor probe. The most common (and most essential type of probe for aquaculturists) is dissolved oxygen. This probe measures the amount of oxygen in the water. Most species prefer this number to remain above 5 mg/L, but cool-water species like trout and salmon require even higher numbers. Checking dissolved oxygen levels regularly lets the farmer identify when the system is becoming strained due to the growing biomass. If dissolved oxygen levels are to drop to a critical point, the farmer should increase aeration or add supplemental oxygen to bring dissolved oxygen levels back to normal.

The two most common types of dissolved oxygen meters are optical (click here: https://globalaquaculturesupply.com/hanna-optical-dissolved-oxygen-meter/) and galvanic (click here: https://globalaquaculturesupply.com/waterproof-portable-dissolved-oxygen-and-bod-meter/). We always recommend optical probes if possible, as their reading is more accurate and their maintenance requirements are far lower than galvanic probes. Other handheld meters can measure even more parameters (with some models reading oxygen, pH, salinity, turbidity, and more), all in one easy to use package. We recommend that farmers sample their water using a handheld meter at least twice daily and log all water quality parameters at each reading. When a parameter is different than the norm, it is easy to tell that something needs to be fixed.

For more information on these products, take a look at the water quality equipment page (click here: https://globalaquaculturesupply.com/water-quality-equipment-supplies/) at globalaquaculturesupply.com.

#AquacultureInsights #aquaculture #aquaculturesupply #aquacultureequipment #globalaquaculturesupply #globalaquaculturesupplycompany #handheldmeters #dissolvedoxygen

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