Portland District, US Army Corps of Engineers

Portland District, US Army Corps of Engineers The Portland District has one of the Nation’s most diverse and comprehensive civil works programs, covering southwest Washington and most of Oregon.

If you are looking for more information about the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, please visit http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil

Operating as usual

Consolidation of Unsaturated Clay-Soils??? Talk about a page-turner! 📖Today is #ReadABookDay. We know what we're going t...
09/06/2021

Consolidation of Unsaturated Clay-Soils???
Talk about a page-turner! 📖

Today is #ReadABookDay. We know what we're going to cozy up with in some nook.

What are you reading? 👇

Consolidation of Unsaturated Clay-Soils???
Talk about a page-turner! 📖

Today is #ReadABookDay. We know what we're going to cozy up with in some nook.

What are you reading? 👇

It's #WorldBeardDay, so we're throwin' it back to our favorite face of fur: the luscious landscape—the magnificent mane—...
09/04/2021

It's #WorldBeardDay, so we're throwin' it back to our favorite face of fur: the luscious landscape—the magnificent mane—of Maj. Henry Robert, the man who established us back in 1871.

A lot has changed in our 150 years (including the fact that our commanders no longer have beards). But here's something as timeless as a good set of whiskers: our commitment to serving the great people of the Pacific Northwest.

It's #WorldBeardDay, so we're throwin' it back to our favorite face of fur: the luscious landscape—the magnificent mane—of Maj. Henry Robert, the man who established us back in 1871.

A lot has changed in our 150 years (including the fact that our commanders no longer have beards). But here's something as timeless as a good set of whiskers: our commitment to serving the great people of the Pacific Northwest.

Walking out on a jetty is a good way to get close to the ocean. It’s also a good way to become *part* of the ocean.If yo...
09/03/2021

Walking out on a jetty is a good way to get close to the ocean. It’s also a good way to become *part* of the ocean.

If you happen to be hitting the coast this holiday weekend, remember: Jetties are potentially very dangerous places to be. Here’s why:

🌊 Waves have literally zero chill and will not hesitate to remove you from a jetty in a most impolite manner. Don’t blame the waves. Blame you. Waves are just doing what waves do: crash into things.

🌊 Jetties are sensitive and could take offense to being trampled all over.

🌊 Sea spray might make rock surfaces slippery. We don’t need to tell you what could happen next, but we will: You will probably slip and, absolute best-case scenario, embarrass yourself. More likely scenario: You will go the way of so many who have attempted the milk crate challenge.

🌊 You could fall into a crevasse or sinkhole.

🌊 Hidden caverns within the structure could suddenly collapse.

🌊 If you happen to fall into the water, waves and strong currents could prevent your safe recovery.

🌊 Jetties are made of giant rocks that could shift and fall. And trust us: You won’t get no satisfaction from these rolling stones. Err, you WILL get no satisfaction. Or… What we mean to say is they’ll crush you.

Bottom line: Our jetties were built to aid ships traveling between rivers and the ocean—not for recreational uses. So if you could go ahead and avoid them, that would be grreeeeaaat. Mmmkay?

Thaaaank you.

Walking out on a jetty is a good way to get close to the ocean. It’s also a good way to become *part* of the ocean.

If you happen to be hitting the coast this holiday weekend, remember: Jetties are potentially very dangerous places to be. Here’s why:

🌊 Waves have literally zero chill and will not hesitate to remove you from a jetty in a most impolite manner. Don’t blame the waves. Blame you. Waves are just doing what waves do: crash into things.

🌊 Jetties are sensitive and could take offense to being trampled all over.

🌊 Sea spray might make rock surfaces slippery. We don’t need to tell you what could happen next, but we will: You will probably slip and, absolute best-case scenario, embarrass yourself. More likely scenario: You will go the way of so many who have attempted the milk crate challenge.

🌊 You could fall into a crevasse or sinkhole.

🌊 Hidden caverns within the structure could suddenly collapse.

🌊 If you happen to fall into the water, waves and strong currents could prevent your safe recovery.

🌊 Jetties are made of giant rocks that could shift and fall. And trust us: You won’t get no satisfaction from these rolling stones. Err, you WILL get no satisfaction. Or… What we mean to say is they’ll crush you.

Bottom line: Our jetties were built to aid ships traveling between rivers and the ocean—not for recreational uses. So if you could go ahead and avoid them, that would be grreeeeaaat. Mmmkay?

Thaaaank you.

As you head into the #LaborDay weekend, you may also be heading into the water for a little recreation. Here are a few t...
09/03/2021

As you head into the #LaborDay weekend, you may also be heading into the water for a little recreation. Here are a few tips to keep you safe:

🌊 Wear a life jacket. Let’s just get the obvious one out of the way first. And you know what? You kind of look like Boromir in that jacket. Does it protect against arrows?

🌊 The water at our recreation sites poses unique dangers, like undercurrents and hidden debris. So know your swimming abilities and avoid swimming alone. You wouldn’t try to fight a bunch of Orcs off with just your sword, right? Right???

🌊 Expect the unexpected. Man, those Orcs came out of NOWHERE!

🌊 Understand boater’s hypnosis. Your boat can put you under a spell. Did you know that? Sort of like the One Ring. In this case, though, you’re not looking at invisibility or the power to dominate others. You are looking at slower reaction times, though, and you don’t want that.

🌊 Don’t go chasing waterfalls. Stick to the rivers and the lakes that you’re used to (unless, you know, you’re going to Rivendell…which has a lot of waterfalls). But again, even familiar rivers and lakes can be dangerous.

🌊 Eliminate alcohol use.

Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xHssm

#watersafety #PleaseWearIt #lifejacket

As you head into the #LaborDay weekend, you may also be heading into the water for a little recreation. Here are a few tips to keep you safe:

🌊 Wear a life jacket. Let’s just get the obvious one out of the way first. And you know what? You kind of look like Boromir in that jacket. Does it protect against arrows?

🌊 The water at our recreation sites poses unique dangers, like undercurrents and hidden debris. So know your swimming abilities and avoid swimming alone. You wouldn’t try to fight a bunch of Orcs off with just your sword, right? Right???

🌊 Expect the unexpected. Man, those Orcs came out of NOWHERE!

🌊 Understand boater’s hypnosis. Your boat can put you under a spell. Did you know that? Sort of like the One Ring. In this case, though, you’re not looking at invisibility or the power to dominate others. You are looking at slower reaction times, though, and you don’t want that.

🌊 Don’t go chasing waterfalls. Stick to the rivers and the lakes that you’re used to (unless, you know, you’re going to Rivendell…which has a lot of waterfalls). But again, even familiar rivers and lakes can be dangerous.

🌊 Eliminate alcohol use.

Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xHssm

#watersafety #PleaseWearIt #lifejacket

09/02/2021
Dams et al Episode 47: Plankowners

The thumbnail alone should make you want to watch this video, but the added bonus is that you'll learn what plankowners are. (Spoiler alert: They are not necessarily good at yoga.)

This is Bonneville Lock & Dam four years ago. #OnThisDay in 2017, a carelessly tossed firework smoldered away in a steep...
09/02/2021

This is Bonneville Lock & Dam four years ago.

#OnThisDay in 2017, a carelessly tossed firework smoldered away in a steep river canyon along the Eagle Creek Trail in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, igniting a blaze that would spread more than 48,000 acres.

That summer was not unlike the one we’re experiencing now. Hot, dry, and starved of rainfall. After going without rain for more than 80 days, the river canyon was a tinderbox.

The Eagle Creek Fire, as it came to be known, swept through the Gorge rapidly and jumped the #ColumbiaRiver, scorching healthy forests in both Oregon and Washington.

Another nearly three months would pass—Nov. 30, 2017—before the U.S. Forest Service could fully contain it.

This view of Bonneville Dam, just two days into the fire and surrounded by an inferno of burning hillside, looks like something from a nightmare. As you head into the Labor Day weekend, let it be a reminder to exercise caution and make smart decisions.

This is the most beautiful place in the world to live. (Change our minds.) Let’s work together to keep it safe and healthy as we go about our celebrations, whatever those may be.

Here are some things to keep in mind:

🔥 If you’re camping, bring a fire extinguisher with you. That way, if you happen to see a fire, you can drown that sucker out faster than those lectures from your boring Economics teacher. "Anyone? Anyone?"

🔥 Build fires away from trees or bushes and don’t leave them unattended. But better yet—especially this year—don’t build them at all. We’re not trying to harsh the vibe. But conditions are perfect for a fire to start. Here are some alternatives we put together for you: facebook.com/PortlandCorps/posts/10159743926843792

🔥 Following from the above point: Campfires are currently a no-go at many of our recreation sites. See current status by site: www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Recreation/Site-Status/

🔥 And remember: Fireworks are never allowed on Corps lands. But they’re lame anyway, so probably don’t do them anywhere. Here are some alternatives we put together for you: facebook.com/PortlandCorps/posts/10159697975183792

🔥 Try to avoid driving over dry grass. Let’s face it: Your vehicle doesn’t give a rip about the environment—or about starting a giant wildfire. Driving over dry grass is a good way to send a field up in flames.

🔥 Be safe with the use of charcoal grills. They are clumsy and can spill a load full of hot coals all over the place faster than you can say, “Dude, don’t harsh my mellow.”

🔥 Don’t throw ci******es out. Just imagine them as little cancer-causing but otherwise well-meaning objects with real feelings. How would you like being thrown from a moving vehicle? At least have the decency to soak me in water and discard my extinguished body safely at a later time.

Enjoy the long weekend. Crack a cold booch for us. Have fun. And please...be safe.

#OTD #TBT #ThrowbackThursday #RecreateResponsibly #firesafety #OneLessSpark #KeepOregonGreen #KnowBeforeYouGo #LaborDay

This is Bonneville Lock & Dam four years ago.

#OnThisDay in 2017, a carelessly tossed firework smoldered away in a steep river canyon along the Eagle Creek Trail in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, igniting a blaze that would spread more than 48,000 acres.

That summer was not unlike the one we’re experiencing now. Hot, dry, and starved of rainfall. After going without rain for more than 80 days, the river canyon was a tinderbox.

The Eagle Creek Fire, as it came to be known, swept through the Gorge rapidly and jumped the #ColumbiaRiver, scorching healthy forests in both Oregon and Washington.

Another nearly three months would pass—Nov. 30, 2017—before the U.S. Forest Service could fully contain it.

This view of Bonneville Dam, just two days into the fire and surrounded by an inferno of burning hillside, looks like something from a nightmare. As you head into the Labor Day weekend, let it be a reminder to exercise caution and make smart decisions.

This is the most beautiful place in the world to live. (Change our minds.) Let’s work together to keep it safe and healthy as we go about our celebrations, whatever those may be.

Here are some things to keep in mind:

🔥 If you’re camping, bring a fire extinguisher with you. That way, if you happen to see a fire, you can drown that sucker out faster than those lectures from your boring Economics teacher. "Anyone? Anyone?"

🔥 Build fires away from trees or bushes and don’t leave them unattended. But better yet—especially this year—don’t build them at all. We’re not trying to harsh the vibe. But conditions are perfect for a fire to start. Here are some alternatives we put together for you: facebook.com/PortlandCorps/posts/10159743926843792

🔥 Following from the above point: Campfires are currently a no-go at many of our recreation sites. See current status by site: www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Recreation/Site-Status/

🔥 And remember: Fireworks are never allowed on Corps lands. But they’re lame anyway, so probably don’t do them anywhere. Here are some alternatives we put together for you: facebook.com/PortlandCorps/posts/10159697975183792

🔥 Try to avoid driving over dry grass. Let’s face it: Your vehicle doesn’t give a rip about the environment—or about starting a giant wildfire. Driving over dry grass is a good way to send a field up in flames.

🔥 Be safe with the use of charcoal grills. They are clumsy and can spill a load full of hot coals all over the place faster than you can say, “Dude, don’t harsh my mellow.”

🔥 Don’t throw ci******es out. Just imagine them as little cancer-causing but otherwise well-meaning objects with real feelings. How would you like being thrown from a moving vehicle? At least have the decency to soak me in water and discard my extinguished body safely at a later time.

Enjoy the long weekend. Crack a cold booch for us. Have fun. And please...be safe.

#OTD #TBT #ThrowbackThursday #RecreateResponsibly #firesafety #OneLessSpark #KeepOregonGreen #KnowBeforeYouGo #LaborDay

Welcome to the Graveyard of the Pacific......which was looking about as ominous last night as you might expect for a pla...
08/31/2021

Welcome to the Graveyard of the Pacific...

...which was looking about as ominous last night as you might expect for a place referred to as a graveyard.

This is where the 1,200-mile Columbia River violently collides with the Pacific Ocean, exploding in waves as high as 40 feet—the world's most treacherous entry to a major commercial waterway.

Adding to the danger are massive, shifting sandbars created by the immense amounts of sediment the river brings downstream. They move every season.

Countless ships have wrecked here because of the intense conditions, which can change by the hour (hence the graveyard nickname).

Enter us. And the hopper dredge Essayons.

Each year, around late summer, the Essayons begins a six-week project to clean up the Columbia Bar.

And it's vital work, as this is the gateway for more than $20 billion in trade annually.

The work of the Essayons goes hand in hand with the system of three jetties we built here between 1885 and 1939. Together, they make this critical shipping corridor a safer place.

The Essayons will be maintaining the channel here at the mouth of the Columbia through September.

📸 Adam Bacon / Portland District

Welcome to the Graveyard of the Pacific...

...which was looking about as ominous last night as you might expect for a place referred to as a graveyard.

This is where the 1,200-mile Columbia River violently collides with the Pacific Ocean, exploding in waves as high as 40 feet—the world's most treacherous entry to a major commercial waterway.

Adding to the danger are massive, shifting sandbars created by the immense amounts of sediment the river brings downstream. They move every season.

Countless ships have wrecked here because of the intense conditions, which can change by the hour (hence the graveyard nickname).

Enter us. And the hopper dredge Essayons.

Each year, around late summer, the Essayons begins a six-week project to clean up the Columbia Bar.

And it's vital work, as this is the gateway for more than $20 billion in trade annually.

The work of the Essayons goes hand in hand with the system of three jetties we built here between 1885 and 1939. Together, they make this critical shipping corridor a safer place.

The Essayons will be maintaining the channel here at the mouth of the Columbia through September.

📸 Adam Bacon / Portland District

All four buildings involved in yesterday's fire at our U.S. Moorings complex were burned beyond salvage and repair.Locat...
08/31/2021

All four buildings involved in yesterday's fire at our U.S. Moorings complex were burned beyond salvage and repair.

Located on the west bank of the Willamette River, near the St. Johns Bridge, the U.S. Government Moorings provides port, supply and repair facilities for our fleet of dredges, hydrosurvey vessels, and other support vessels.

📸 KGW-TV

All four buildings involved in yesterday's fire at our U.S. Moorings complex were burned beyond salvage and repair.

Located on the west bank of the Willamette River, near the St. Johns Bridge, the U.S. Government Moorings provides port, supply and repair facilities for our fleet of dredges, hydrosurvey vessels, and other support vessels.

📸 KGW-TV

On Monday afternoon, a fire at the U.S. Moorings complex destroyed two buildings and damaged two others. There were no i...
08/31/2021

On Monday afternoon, a fire at the U.S. Moorings complex destroyed two buildings and damaged two others. There were no injuries or loss of life, thanks in large part to the swift actions of Portland Fire and Rescue.

The fire bureau acted swiftly and aggressively to contain the fire, sending multiple units to suppress the blaze.

We are grateful that no one was injured during the fire or fire response, and we appreciate the efforts of the firefighters who responded. Without their quick actions, the damage would've been much worse.

We are working alongside local officials and will investigate the cause and assess the damage once it is safe to do so.

Located on the west bank of the Willamette River, near the St. Johns Bridge, the U.S. Government Moorings provides port, supply and repair facilities for our fleet of dredges, hydrosurvey vessels, and other support vessels.

📸 courtesy of Portland Fire & Rescue

On Monday afternoon, a fire at the U.S. Moorings complex destroyed two buildings and damaged two others. There were no injuries or loss of life, thanks in large part to the swift actions of Portland Fire and Rescue.

The fire bureau acted swiftly and aggressively to contain the fire, sending multiple units to suppress the blaze.

We are grateful that no one was injured during the fire or fire response, and we appreciate the efforts of the firefighters who responded. Without their quick actions, the damage would've been much worse.

We are working alongside local officials and will investigate the cause and assess the damage once it is safe to do so.

Located on the west bank of the Willamette River, near the St. Johns Bridge, the U.S. Government Moorings provides port, supply and repair facilities for our fleet of dredges, hydrosurvey vessels, and other support vessels.

📸 courtesy of Portland Fire & Rescue

Address

333 SW 1st Ave
Portland, OR
97204

http://www.trimet.org +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Welcome to the official Portland District (NWP) page on Facebook. Become a fan. Share your opinions on the discussion board. Find out what’s going on in the events section. Facebook is NOT the site to leave official comments under official government public involvement, public hearing, and public comment processes. These official comments must be submitted to the places directed in official notices and must be submitted in the forms required in the official notices. Facebook can only be used for unofficial comments for which no official action, response, or other action is required or expected. While we value everyone’s opinion, please keep in mind we maintain this site according to the following guidelines: • We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful, inflammatory or intended to defame anyone or any organization. • We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. • We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. • You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Any posts not following these guidelines will be removed. We reserve the right to remove comments for any reason, in addition to the reasons listed above. The appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement by the Portland District or the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. If you are looking for the official Portland District website, see http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil If you would like to submit photos from events, comments or if you have questions, send an e-mail to: [email protected]

General information

Our vision: the world's premier engineering organization responding to our nation's needs in peace and war. A full-spectrum Engineer Force of high quality, dedicated soldiers and civilians: Trained and ready A vital part of the Army Dedicated to public service An Army values-based organization

Opening Hours

Monday 7:30am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 7:30am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 7:30am - 4:30pm
Thursday 7:30am - 4:30pm
Friday 7:30am - 4:30pm

Telephone

(503) 808-4510

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I recommend Jack Gerald for any hacking problem he is a dark hacker chat him on facebook now
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When is the annual Eagle Watch event at the Dalles Dam? Have the Eagles arrived for 2021? Will you post anything on your website or FB about the Eagles this year?
Sometime this morning at Lookout Point. Smoke came in much heavier later in the day. It was refreshing seeing a little more sky at work today even if for a few brief hours. Be good to each other. We’re all going to need each other in this. Stay safe.
Heart breaking to see all the damage by rioters in Portland. Praying all in District Office are staying safe.
Jirtuu Ilmana Oroomoo
Last year the Corp reworked the breakwater in Port Orford, Oregon. The final act was the placement of six very large rocks (20+ tons each) at the outside of the southeast corner of the dock. Over the winter, through waves eroding the support under the rocks, the rocks have drifted away from the dock toward the southwest about 10 feet. The rock in the attached photo now appears to be precariously and insufficiently supported (my opinion and I am no expert) and at risk of toppling over. I have concerns for the safety of people being in the vicinity of the rock, whether they have the right to be there or not, if the rock should fall over do to one of the smaller rocks, apparently supporting the big rock, "giving way" for what ever reason or we should experience an earth tremor, which are common here on the coast, and the rock falling on them. I have more photos, but I see that I am only allowed to upload one. Can this issue please be evaluated and it be determined if there is need for corrective action? Thank you Dave Foley
I feel like we got robbed by Washington. It's open on that side to fish. but Oregon side still closed 😆. We have a spot to fish but it was not enough room for 1000 people it's just small creek. Sorry Oregonian
I am an Oregonian I was 19 when Mt Saint Helens errupted. I remember I was getting ready for work. My dad worked graveyard and so I would take his car to work. I grabbed my stuff and he told me to be careful because the ash was thick and I might have to put in a new airfilter before I got to work which was about 20 min away. I got in his car, turned the engine on and before he could say "stop don't turn on the windshield wipers, I beat him to it and I turned them on and scratched his windshiled." We had to carry atleast 2 gallons of water to wash the windshield off and wear a mask for health reasons.
Good evening! One of the fascinating highways in Oregon was through the Columbia Gorge. I have a few old postcards that show some pretty good detail. Here are the Bonneville Tunnels with Bonneville Dam in the Background. Union Pacific's railroad tunnel, which is now blocked from this view by the westbound I-84 bridge, is seen as well.